THEME The Polar Bear Blog
Yorkshire Wildlife Park in England welcomes their first polar bear.
Victor, who weighs 1,058 pounds, arrived at the Yorkshire Wildlife Park on Thursday after making the well-planned journey from Rhenen Zoo in Holland by ferry. You can watch Victor’s journey here.
The 15-year-old bear has been so successful in the European Breeding programme that he had to be retired. But now Victor will spend his retirement in a 10 acre environment which mimics the summer tundra. It includes rocky hills, dens and a lake covering an area of 6,500 square metres and reaches 8 metres deep with an island situated in the centre.
Victor is now part of the Park’s Project Polar which aims to house retired polar bears or others that are in need of rescuing from unsuitable conditions.
Visit Yorkshire Wildlife Park website for more.
Photo via YWP

Yorkshire Wildlife Park in England welcomes their first polar bear.

Victor, who weighs 1,058 pounds, arrived at the Yorkshire Wildlife Park on Thursday after making the well-planned journey from Rhenen Zoo in Holland by ferry. You can watch Victor’s journey here.

The 15-year-old bear has been so successful in the European Breeding programme that he had to be retired. But now Victor will spend his retirement in a 10 acre environment which mimics the summer tundra. It includes rocky hills, dens and a lake covering an area of 6,500 square metres and reaches 8 metres deep with an island situated in the centre.

Victor is now part of the Park’s Project Polar which aims to house retired polar bears or others that are in need of rescuing from unsuitable conditions.

Visit Yorkshire Wildlife Park website for more.

Photo via YWP

The Long Fast Begins

The first satellite-collared polar bears from Western and Southern Hudson Bay are now ashore. Bears in seasonal ice areas conserve energy and live off their fat reserves until the ice forms again in late fall.

Read more at Polar Bears International

The Long Fast Begins

The first satellite-collared polar bears from Western and Southern Hudson Bay are now ashore. Bears in seasonal ice areas conserve energy and live off their fat reserves until the ice forms again in late fall.

Read more at Polar Bears International

Sea ice formation in the Arctic occurred earlier in November 2013 compared to recent years, enabling polar bears to return to the sea ice sooner and bringing a welcoming chance for the bears to hunt and feed on seals earlier.
Although the recovery of the Arctic sea ice is certainly good news, it was the 6th lowest November extent with 224,000 square miles lower than average in the 30-year satellite data collection records according to the National Snow & Ice Data Center.
Fingers crossed the early occurrence of sea ice freeze up permits the bears to celebrate by feasting on seals and other substantial meals.

Photo: Richard Hileman

Sea ice formation in the Arctic occurred earlier in November 2013 compared to recent years, enabling polar bears to return to the sea ice sooner and bringing a welcoming chance for the bears to hunt and feed on seals earlier.

Although the recovery of the Arctic sea ice is certainly good news, it was the 6th lowest November extent with 224,000 square miles lower than average in the 30-year satellite data collection records according to the National Snow & Ice Data Center.

Fingers crossed the early occurrence of sea ice freeze up permits the bears to celebrate by feasting on seals and other substantial meals.

Photo: Richard Hileman

Polar bear birth caught on camera in colour for the first time. Seven-year-old polar bear Giovanna gave birth to twins last Monday at the Hellabrunn Zoo in Munich, Germany. Giovanna is a first-time mum and keepers say she is taking excellent care of her cubs which appear to be developing well. Links: more information / watch the videos

Polar bear birth caught on camera in colour for the first time.

Seven-year-old polar bear Giovanna gave birth to twins last Monday at the Hellabrunn Zoo in Munich, Germany. Giovanna is a first-time mum and keepers say she is taking excellent care of her cubs which appear to be developing well.

Links: more information / watch the videos

New study finds the Chukchi Sea polar bear population to have held stable or increased slightly. However, although the population appears to be doing well for now, it could eventually face the same challenges as its adjacent southern Beaufort Sea population, which has experienced recent declines in body size and recruitment. The rate of sea ice decline in the Chukchi region is greater than that in the Beaufort Sea and is likely to have negative effects on their body condition and survival at some point.

Gus, the Central Park Zoo polar bear, dies aged 27 after veterinarians found a large and inoperable tumor. The Wildlife Conservation Society explained, “Gus was euthanized yesterday while under anesthesia for a medical procedure conducted by WCS veterinarians. Gus had been exhibiting abnormal feeding behavior with low appetite and difficulty chewing and swallowing his food. During the procedure, veterinarians determined Gus had a large, inoperable tumor in his thyroid region”.  Zoo officials estimate more than 20 million people visited Gus in his lifetime at the zoo. He will be missed dearly by many.

Gus, the Central Park Zoo polar bear, dies aged 27 after veterinarians found a large and inoperable tumor.

The Wildlife Conservation Society explained, “Gus was euthanized yesterday while under anesthesia for a medical procedure conducted by WCS veterinarians. Gus had been exhibiting abnormal feeding behavior with low appetite and difficulty chewing and swallowing his food. During the procedure, veterinarians determined Gus had a large, inoperable tumor in his thyroid region”.

Zoo officials estimate more than 20 million people visited Gus in his lifetime at the zoo. He will be missed dearly by many.

Oregon Zoo’s polar bear, Tasul, and her job as a research assistant. Tasul is currently helping researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey study how climate change is affecting wild polar bears in the Arctic. She has been fitted with a collar which includes an accelerometer that measures her movements while she’s walking, eating, sleeping and swimming. The collar turns these behaviours into electronic signals and along with video footage being collected researchers will be able to use this to create a digital library of polar bear behaviour.Once the signals have been calibrated, collars similar to the one Tasul wears will be placed on free-roaming bears in the Arctic. This gives researchers the opportunity to monitor the bears’ behaviour without having to observe them directly, which can be difficult to study, given the remote, harsh environment they inhabit.More information on Tasul and her role in research can be found here.Tasul’s collar also had attached a Go-Pro Hero camera which gave a bear’s-eye view. Check out a clip taken from the camera on Oregon Zoo’s YouTube page.

Oregon Zoo’s polar bear, Tasul, and her job as a research assistant.

Tasul is currently helping researchers at the U.S. Geological Survey study how climate change is affecting wild polar bears in the Arctic. She has been fitted with a collar which includes an accelerometer that measures her movements while she’s walking, eating, sleeping and swimming. The collar turns these behaviours into electronic signals and along with video footage being collected researchers will be able to use this to create a digital library of polar bear behaviour.

Once the signals have been calibrated, collars similar to the one Tasul wears will be placed on free-roaming bears in the Arctic. This gives researchers the opportunity to monitor the bears’ behaviour without having to observe them directly, which can be difficult to study, given the remote, harsh environment they inhabit.

More information on Tasul and her role in research can be found here.

Tasul’s collar also had attached a Go-Pro Hero camera which gave a bear’s-eye view. Check out a clip taken from the camera on Oregon Zoo’s YouTube page.

explorebears:


Another Win for the Polar Bears! / Post by Erica Wills of Polar Bears International 
The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia has ruled to uphold the 2008 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) ban on the importation of polar bear parts collected by hunting! 
This is an exciting win for polar bears and all who are working so hard to preserve this magnificent species. Congratulations to the USFWS, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), the Defenders of Wildlife, and the Human Society for their successful defense of the 2008 USFWS ruling to list polar bears as Threatened on the Endangered Species Act!

explorebears:

Another Win for the Polar Bears! / Post by Erica Wills of Polar Bears International 

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia has ruled to uphold the 2008 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) ban on the importation of polar bear parts collected by hunting! 

This is an exciting win for polar bears and all who are working so hard to preserve this magnificent species. Congratulations to the USFWS, the International Fund for Animal Welfare (IFAW), the Defenders of Wildlife, and the Human Society for their successful defense of the 2008 USFWS ruling to list polar bears as Threatened on the Endangered Species Act!